fit

Definitions


[fɪt], (Adjective)

Definitions:
- of a suitable quality, standard, or type to meet the required purpose
(e.g: the house was not fit for human habitation)

- in good health, especially because of regular physical exercise
(e.g: my family keep fit by walking and cycling)


Phrases:
- fit for a king
- fit for purpose
- fit to be tied
- fit to bust
- see fit

Origin:
late Middle English: of unknown origin


[fɪt], (Verb)

Definitions:
- be of the right shape and size for
(e.g: those jeans still fit me)

- install or fix (something) into place
(e.g: they fitted smoke alarms to their home)

- be compatible or in agreement with; match
(e.g: the landlord had not seen anyone fitting that description)


Phrases:
- fit for a king
- fit for purpose
- fit to be tied
- fit to bust
- see fit

Origin:


[fɪt], (Noun)

Definitions:
- the particular way in which something, especially a garment or component, fits
(e.g: the dress was a perfect fit)


Phrases:
- fit for a king
- fit for purpose
- fit to be tied
- fit to bust
- see fit

Origin:


[fɪt], (Noun)

Definitions:
- a sudden attack of convulsions and/or loss of consciousness, typical of epilepsy and some other medical conditions
(e.g: the child had frequent fits)

- a sudden short period of uncontrollable coughing, laughter, etc.


Phrases:
- give someone a fit
- have a fit
- in fits
- in fits and starts

Origin:
Old English fitt ‘conflict’, in Middle English ‘position of danger or excitement’, also ‘short period’; the sense ‘sudden attack of illness’ dates from the mid 16th century


[fɪt], (Verb)

Definitions:
- have an epileptic fit
(e.g: he started fitting uncontrollably)


Phrases:
- give someone a fit
- have a fit
- in fits
- in fits and starts

Origin:


[fɪt], (Noun)

Definitions:
- a section of a poem.


Phrases:

Origin:
Old English fitt, perhaps the same word as fit, or related to German Fitze ‘skein of yarn’, in the obsolete sense ‘thread with which weavers mark off a day's work’




definition by Oxford Dictionaries