firm

Definitions


[fəːm], (Adjective)

Definitions:
- having a solid, almost unyielding surface or structure
(e.g: the bed should be reasonably firm, but not too hard)

- strongly felt and unlikely to change
(e.g: he retains a firm belief in the efficacy of prayer)


Phrases:
- a firm hand
- be on firm ground

Origin:
Middle English: from Old French ferme, from Latin firmus


[fəːm], (Verb)

Definitions:
- make more solid or resilient
(e.g: how can I firm up a sagging bustline?)


Phrases:
- a firm hand
- be on firm ground

Origin:


[fəːm], (Adverb)

Definitions:
- in a resolute and determined manner
(e.g: the Chancellor has held firm to tough economic policies)


Phrases:
- a firm hand
- be on firm ground

Origin:


[fəːm], (Noun)

Definitions:
- a business concern, especially one involving a partnership of two or more people
(e.g: state support for small firms)


Phrases:

Origin:
late 16th century: from Spanish and Italian firma, from medieval Latin, from Latin firmare ‘fix, settle’ (in late Latin ‘confirm by signature’), from firmus ‘firm’; compare with farm. The word originally denoted one's autograph or signature; later (mid 18th century) the name under which the business of a firm was transacted, hence the firm itself (late 18th century)




definition by Oxford Dictionaries